Founder interviews, pre-release product design, hand crafted inventions.
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Prototype Tomorrow’s World with Kazendi

Techmog is a liquid network of engineers, programmers, designers and entrepreneurs in and around London who report on the industry we work in, from an insider's view. We're always looking for Londoners with something interesting to say. Send an email to info@techmog.com if you would like to contribute to the website.

Peter Bailey

Freelance Wordpress Developer in London (peabay.xyz) @peabay
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When a potentially revolutionary platform-based technology is revealed the inventor has enough leverage to choose and charge for exclusive access to it. But what if your company isn’t picked? You could buy a pre-release development version, hire a team of developers, and build it in-house. Or you drastically reduce the cost and risk and hire Kazendi.

Maximilian Doelle is an Economics & Strategy for Business graduate who took his passion for cutting-edge tech and built a business around the idea of rapid-prototyping to any company willing to pay. Working out of a nook at WeWork Max has made a fortune producing proof-of-concepts for brands the likes of Lloyds Band, Unilever and Deloitte. Not only does he give access to some extremely sought after tech (especially in the UK), but also provides a way to try ideas without going full production agency on them.

With a long list of devices to choose from Max is able to offer many high-tech products to play with, including iBeacons, Google Glass, Sony Digital Paper, Smart Mirror, Amazon Echo, Chat Bots, Apple Watch, RFID implants and Google Cardboard. He tells me that his biggest success has been with Microsoft’s HoloLens.

Hololens is an augmented reality headset. It differs from virtual reality headsets in that it doesn’t just cover your eyes with a video screen, but overlays graphics onto the real world. Not only that, but it can recognise the contours of the space around it. Placing a virtual cup on a real table is now possible with Hololens.

Having worked with HoloLens for the past three months, I personally would say it is the biggest revolution since the smartphone and will change the way we work fundamentally. -Maximilian Doelle

It’s operated by voice commands and hand gestures. To begin, the user scans the area for [real] objects. A mesh of polygons spreads over chairs, tables and people. The mesh is cached on the device along with its geo-location for future reference. Now, Hololens is ready to interact with the world. The headset runs onboard Windows and does it surprisingly well. Latency is close to nil, dropping only slightly when video is streamed to a computer.

Max showed me a potential use for it which he had built; a platform to aid risk assessment officers in tracking hazards. The wearer uses an incredibly intuitive interface to drop virtual notices onto the real world. It provides an alternative to written reports by literally showing the viewer where problems are. It’s this kind of application which would take Hololens out from the gimmick-bucket and send it down the mainstream.

The kit didn’t come cheaply or easily though. Until now development units were only available in the US, and even now that its release is imminent £4529 for it isn’t a small investment. A trip to America was needed for Max to get his. The investment was a worthy one though and he has vastly recouped the costs by building software for it and hosting demos to anyone interested.

Posted 17th Oct 2016
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